Granite Group Realtors

Posted by Granite Group Realtors on 3/11/2018

You know that your credit score is incredibly important when you want to buy a home. There’s certain things that you could be doing in your everyday life that are hurting your credit score. Here’s what you need to avoid in order to keep your credit score up:

Don’t Allow For Too Many Credit Inquiries

When you’re at the checkout lane at the store, and the clerk informs you that you can save a lot of money if you just open this instant credit card on the spot, that can pose a problem. The issue with this is that the store will be instantly checking your credit score as well. These inquiries hang on your credit report for a certain amount of time. Certain inquiries can also make your score dip. Too many credit inquiries can make lenders suspicious of your ability to be a dependable borrower.

Unpaid Bills Can Add Up

If you forget to pay small credit card bills here and there, it could add up. Think of things like library books, medical bills, and credit card payments. That unreturned library fee that you never paid could come back to haunt you. A medical bill that was sent to collections can become a problem on your credit report. Most of the time, all you need to do is pay these fees up for your score to bounce back. 

Credit Report Errors

Your credit report could have incorrect information about your financial situation and records. Your credit score could be dragged down just because of some errors on the report. If you do find an error on your report, you’ll be able to submit a claim to rectify the error. 

Using Too Much Of Your Available Credit

Just because a credit limit is at $5,000, doesn’t mean that you need to max it out. Even if you pay your bills each month, using too much of your available credit can really harm your score. For your credit score to be calculated and to see how loan worthy you are, your total available credit and how much of that total credit is being used will be put into a formula. Beware of how much of your credit you use in order to keep that score up.

Not Touching Your Credit

You actually need to use your credit in order to build your score. You need credit history in order to have something for loan officers to work with. Accounts that become inactive over time will be closed by default and actually negatively impact your score. 

By using your credit responsibly, you’ll keep your credit score up and be in good shape to buy a house.

Posted by Granite Group Realtors on 7/3/2016

Did you know your credit score is always changing? Your credit score could be one number on one day and a different figure the next and even vary from one credit reporting agency to the next. Your credit score also known as your FICO score is based on the information contained in your credit record. Since your credit file is always changing so is your score. Your credit record changes every time a company you have credit with reports an on-time payment — or more important, a missed payment that's now more than 30 days late. Your score changes each time your credit card balance changes or you apply for new credit. There are three main credit reporting agencies; Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Another factor that could affect your score is that not all lenders report to all agencies. To know your credit score you can pull a free credit report from all three agencies once a year. Look for missing or incorrect information. It is important to get that resolved as soon a possible. Click here for more information on obtaining a free credit report.

Posted by Granite Group Realtors on 4/17/2016

When you are looking to buy a home or refinance it is important that your credit is in tip-top shape. It is often a credit score that gets in the way of a home buyer and their dream home. Credit today means everything as far as your purchasing power. So if you want to be ready when opportunity knocks read on for some for smart ideas on how to keep your credit score going up.

1. Use your credit cards.

This may sound funny but it is important to have credit over having no credit. Paying in cash and over using credit cards isn’t always a good move for your credit score. Cards that are seldom used are often shut down or closed by the credit card companies. Because 30 percent of your credit score is based on your debt-to-credit-limit ratio you will want to have a high your total available credit. Having one account closed increases that ratio of available credit to debt and thus lowers your credit score.

2. Pay off your credit cards.

It may seem to make sense to pay off the highest-interest card first and save the most money in the end. But your credit score will get a bigger boost from knocking off the lowest-balance card. Instead of spreading your monthly payments equally among credit cards, pay down the lowest-balance card first and pay minimum balances on the rest. As you pay off each card, apply the money you would have paid on it to the next-lowest-balance card.

3. Don’t close cards once they are paid off.

The length of time you’ve had credit determines fifteen percent of your score. By closing your oldest account, you can shorten the length of your credit history causing a big hit to your score.

4. Keep the balance low

Much of your credit score is determined by your debt-to-credit-limit ratio on individual accounts. Maxing out one card raises your debt-to-credit-limit ratio and your credit score. So be sure to keep balances as low as possible. Try to target no more than 30 percent of your credit limit.

5. Stay away from retail-card accounts.

These are a big no-no. Retail store cards often have lower limits and higher interest rates. So running up balances on low-limit store cards affects your credit score more negatively than does using one or two bank cards. So in the long run the fifteen percent you were going to save on the one purchase will probably cost you more in the end.  

Posted by Granite Group Realtors on 9/14/2014

You may think your credit is perfect because you pay your bills on time and never miss a payment. If you are having trouble getting a loan and don't know why, it could be that your credit habits are scaring away lenders. Here are some items that may be lurking in your credit report that are making lenders leery: Multiple Lines of Credit If you have a lot of open credit cards this can be a bad signal to lenders. Lenders see this as an indication that you might be having financial difficulty. Credit Inquiries Lenders also don't like it when you inquire about new lines of credit. Applying for credit can have a negative impact on your credit score. Every time you allow a potential lender to pull up your credit report, your score can take a small hit. Co-Signing a Loan When you co-sign for a loan that dept becomes your debt and shows up on your credit report. Potential lenders look at that debt as yours because you are ultimately responsible for it.  If the person you co-signed for stops paying, pays late, or misses payments, your credit report can be negatively impacted. Making Minimum Payments Lenders who view your credit report don't like to see that you are paying just the minimum payment. If you consistently pay the minimum payment due, it could indicate financial stress or confirm that you are unable to pay off the full balance.